Keynotes

 

Millimeter Waves, Millisecond Delays

Shivendra S. Panwar NYU Tandon School of Engineering, USA

ABSTRACT:
Two simultaneous revolutionary changes are occurring in networking: the advent of mmWave networks and the advent of applications that require end-to-end delays of the order of a few milliseconds. mmWave is the first physical layer technology that promises huge wireless bandwidth, but with very poor reliability as a result of its vulnerability to blockage (optical fiber offers high reliability and high bandwidth; sub-6Ghz microwave networks offer lower bandwidth but graceful bandwidth degradation that can be mitigated). The emergence of the need for ultra-low delays for haptic communications and control loops in self-driving cars and other sensor based applications, has radically changed the requirements for layers above the physical layer. These two changes transform standard networking problems, and will lead to a new wave of research. Examples will be used to illustrate this paradigm shift.

BIOGRAPHY:
Shivendra S. Panwar is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Tandon School of Engineering of New York University. He received the B.Tech. degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, in 1981, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1983 and 1986, respectively. He joined the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, Brooklyn (now Tandon School of Engineering of New York University), where he served as department chair. He is currently the Director of the New York State Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications (CATT), a member of NYU WIRELESS, and the Faculty Director of the NY City Media Lab. He spent the summer of 1987 as a Visiting Scientist at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, and has been a consultant to Bell Laboratories. His research interests include the performance analysis and design of networks. Current work includes wireless networks and multimedia transport over networks. He co-authored TCP/IP Essentials: A Lab based Approach, published by the Cambridge University Press. He was co-awarded the IEEE Communication Society’s Leonard G. Abraham Prize in the Field of Communication Systems for 2004. He was a co-author of the IEEE Multimedia Communications Best Paper Award for 2011. He is also a co-winner of a Best Paper Award from IEEE ICC 2016. He is an IEEE Fellow.

 

mmW Networking: If it works now, what next?

Petri Mähönen RWTH Aachen University, Germany

ABSTRACT:
In recent years a tremendous amount of research has been made to enable mmW networking. This has led to the situation that we have first commercial IEEE 802.11ad products available and a roadmap towards mmW extensions of 5G is relatively clear. For the research community the crucial question is, what role – if any – we should play in the coming years. Are the breakthroughs mainly done, and the progress is mostly derivative research and development, or is there something more to expect? In this talk I will explore these questions, and argue that there are still very interesting longer-term research issues related to mmW networking to make it efficient, and there is even space to consider completely new systems for the future research. I will argue that we need to think in more bolder research avenues, if we want to sustain the leading edge role that the research community has exhibited in this domain.

BIOGRAPHY:

Petri Mähönen is a professor and a founding director of the institute for networked systems at RWTH Aachen University. He joined RWTH Aachen as the holder of Ericsson endowed chair of wireless networks in 2002. He has studied and worked in the United States, the United Kingdom and Scandinavia. He is recipient of Telenor Research prize, and has given invited talks in a number of different conferences, universities, and industry. Apart of academic publishing, he has been a part of teams who have invented and successfully technology transferred several patent families for industrial use. He has been and is serving as editor in various IEEE publications and he served as co-TPC chair for IEEE DySPAN 2010 and as general chair for IEEE DySPAN 2011. His group has been in forefront on developing machine learning based cognitive radio technologies, dynamic spectrum access techniques, novel access methods, and earlier in his career he was a project lead for development and implementation for one of the first 40 GHz cellular broadband systems. In general, and foremost, he likes to tinker with cool technology and interesting problems.